Newly released on June 6th of 2012!

Archival Quality Art Duplications, now known as Henry Lorentzen Replicas!
Click on a painting for a bigger view and purchasing information

The Choices: These paintings have been selected for their unique, yet classic, subject matter.  Born in July of 1900, artist Henry Lorentzen loved the North Dakota terrain, the Missouri River and the Native American scenes that reflected a peaceful daily lifestyle.  Having seen many “Kodak moments”, as a young boy, but without means to capture them, he developed a burning desire to recreate beloved images with brush, canvas and paint.  Henry worked from memory into his 97th year to consistently produce the pictures that were displayed in his mind.  Working each day and rarely leaving home for travel, he hastened to preserve, on canvas, his memories of North Dakota and a chapter in history that was quickly drawing to a close

The Expertise: While modernization has changed our world in tragic ways, it has also opened previously non-existent resources and possibilities in many areas including the duplication of artwork.  Enter, now, the beautiful technology of Giclée Prints!  Giclée (pronounced gee-klay) is a French word that means “to spray”. The term Giclée Print denotes an elevation in printmaking technology. Images are generated from high resolution digital scans and printed with archival quality inks onto various substrates including canvas, fine art and photo-base paper. The Giclée printing process provides better color accuracy than other means of reproduction.

The Replicas: All wall prints are made to the exact measurements of the original artwork and make use of archival quality ink on acid-free, 100% cotton rag paper, (315 gsm).  When displayed under UV protection glass, the print will resist fading up to 300 years.   Without the glass, the print will resist fading up to 35 years while in direct sunlight. All non canvas art prints come with a generous border to assist the framer when applying a mat and frame.

 

The Quality : The quality of the Giclée print rivals traditional silver-halide and gelatin printing processes and is commonly found in museums, art galleries, and photographic galleries.   An interesting side note is the market. Numerous examples of Giclée prints can be found in New York City at the Metropolitan Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Chelsea Galleries. Recent auctions of Giclée prints have fetched $10,800 for Annie Leibovitz, $9,600 for Chuck Close, and $22,800 for Wolfgang Tillmans (April 23/24 2004, Photographs, New York, Phillips de Pury & Company.

 

The Reproductions: All wall prints are made to the exact measurements of the original artwork and make use of archival quality ink on canvas.  When displayed under UV protection glass, the print will resist fading up to 300 years.   Without the glass, the print will resist fading up to 35 years while in direct sunlight.